Genève Aéroport closes its accounts for 2010 with a very good performance


18.04.2011

Genève Aéroport has closed its accounts for the financial year 2010 with a record sales figure of more than CHF 320 million, enabling it to achieve a profit of nearly CHF 49 million. The increase in passenger traffic and the slight recovery in commercial activity means that the airport can now look forward with complete confidence to the significant investments planned over the coming years.

Mr François Longchamp, the chairman of the board of directors and Mr Robert Deillon, the general manager of Genève Aéroport, have published the financial results for the year 2010.

This financial year has confirmed the recovery which began in Geneva during the second half of 2009, at a time when the world aviation sector was still in the throes of a major economic crisis.

Despite the heavy snow storms which affected our installations and blocked most of the main European airports at the beginning of the winter, followed by the clouds of volcanic ash which forced the closure of the air space of much of the continent, Genève Aéroport processed 11 880 398 passengers, an increase of 4.91% on the previous year.

Sales for 2010 reached a record high of CHF 322'657'000 and there was a net profit of CHF 48'894'000.

Aviation revenue (landing fees, passenger fees, etc.) accounted for 49.5% of total income, as against 50.5% for non-aviation revenue (including income from shops which represented 23.5% of the total income of Genève Aéroport).

During the course of 2010 – defined as a year of transition between the major works carried out in the main airport (GVA+ project) and the first phases connected with the construction of the future EAST wing – investments amounted to CHF 51'649'000.

"The 2010 results confirm that Genève Aéroport is in good economic health. It will be noted that, although this was a difficult period, we have succeeded in maintaining a financial balance which enables us to look forward to future investments with complete confidence," said Robert Deillon with satisfaction.